Glory in the Face

By Mike Wilkins

The Face of Christ and the Strength to Face Anything

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  • Mar30Thu

    Fury and the Giggles

    March 30, 2017
    One day in the 1970’s, in a Queen’s University course on Old English Literature (Chaucer in particular), I got a higher grade than almost all of my class-mates by submitting a very brief essay that clearly conveyed to the professor that I had nothing intelligent to write about “The Significance of Colour in The Canterbury Tales.”
  • Mar22Wed

    The Best of All Knacks

    March 22, 2017
    Sometimes, there is a knack to learning how to do some tricky thing. Riding a unicycle. “Solving” a Rubik’s Cube. Juggling tennis balls. Those sorts of things. How much the knack means to a person depends on how much that person would like to do that trick. So then if a person was convinced that the best of all possible knacks is the knack of becoming strong enough to face anything, what should that person be focussed on? What might that person give more effort and time to.
  • Mar13Mon

    What the Busy Doctor Wrote

    March 13, 2017
    In writing Glory in the Face, I was not the least bit shy about my indebtedness to my Dead Men of the 17th and 18th centuries: John Owen (1616-1683) and Jonathan Edwards (1703-1758). In fact, I dedicated the book to “the memory and continuing fruitfulness” of both of them. The fruit they bore in my life was both exegetical—helping me to understand 2 Corinthians 3 and 4—and practical—guiding me in how to go about growing in the capacity to “see the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.”
  • Mar7Tue

    Light on a Heavy Backpack

    March 7, 2017
    An obvious question to ask on every portage: "How did this pack get so heavy?"
  • Feb27Mon

    Heavy Knapsacks on Parade?

    February 27, 2017
    Someone reading “Glory in the Face” might be persuaded that a parade is an instructive picture of the life of a follower of Christ. But Charles Spurgeon, one of my “Final Five Dead Men,” might have disapproved of the metaphor.